Lake Hauroko the soughing of the wind

Lake Hauroko

Hauroko means “the soughing of the wind”, and the lake lives up to this at times, as the wind can create huge waves on the lake in a matter of minutes, funnelled by the steep surrounding hills. The lake is 642 metres deep, which makes it New Zealand’s deepest lake.

Lake Hauroko

Lake Hauroko

The lake provides plentiful fishing and kayaking opportunities with other varied recreational opportunities in the area and commercial operators to help you explore. Leaving Lake Hauroko, the Wairaurahiri River is the steepest river in New Zealand to be navigated by commercial jet boat operators.

The lake also provides access to the Dusky Track.

Thicket Burn Campsite:

 (basic facilities)

This campsite is located at the entrance to Fiordland National Park on the way to Lake Hauroko.

Lake Hauroko Bush Walk:

(40 minutes return)

From the car park at Lake Hauroko, an easy loop walk skirts a swampy area close to the lake.  The trees change from mainly matai, totara and rimu in the wetter area, to mountain beech in the drier areas.

Lake Hauroko Lookout:

 (4 hours return)

Lake Hauroko Lookout

Lake Hauroko Lookout

The track near the jetty follows along the lake edge, before climbing steeply to the lookout.  On a clear day there are stunning views of Lake Hauroko, Foveaux Strait to the south, the Takitimu Mountains to the east and the Princess and Kaherekoau Maintains in the northwest.  This track is steep and rough, but well worth the effort.

Big Totara Walk:

(30 minutes return)
On the Lillburn Monowai Road in Dean Forest, is signposted from the Lillburn Valley Road (the road to Lake Hauroko).  Along this pleasant short walk you will see some of the largest totara trees in Southland, which are over 1,000 years old.  This small pocket of forest has never been logged.

Access:

Lake Hauroko is signposted from Clifden, 36 kilometres along the Lillburn Valley Road (20 kilometres of this road are unsealed).

1 Response

  1. Kerstin says:

    Very good information. Lucky me I discovered your site
    by accident (stumbleupon). I’ve bookmarked it for later!

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